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A Place where I can spout off about anything . . . and often do 



Tom Young

A list of unrelated thoughts

  • Why are half the cars made today grey?

  • Why do we have only two rather extreme choices when it comes to politics? Why can't we have a moderate choice to chose from? The Democratic party is way to far to the left for most of us and the Republican party is out of control to the right. We need someone to stand up for those of us who fall in the middle. We have no voice. It's either one extreme or the other. No true sense of compromise exists in Washington, and the Republican party in particular won't budge from their extreme position. Come on people, let's start a third party to represent the middle class (or what's left of it).
  • I've asked myself what we really do in the United States anymore, since manufacturing has moved to China, and Technical Support has moved to India.  It would seem that the thing we are doing best right now is destroying our own economy and giving up any hope of recovery.  The gap between the very rich and the rest of us is widening, and without a working base, the rich too will fail and join the rest of us sooner or later.  Every time a job is outsourced and every time we buy the products from abroad that we used to manufacture here the closer we all come to placing ourselves nearer the bottom of the list of national economies.  I'm not saying to stop buying from abroad entirely, but lets stop shipping our jobs over there, so that the products become cheaper.  In the end we don't gain by giving up our own ability to buy the very products we outsourced.  Corporate America needs to think of the impact of such actions on their (former) workers as well as the (temporary) increase in stock value.  That stock will tumble when there is no one left to buy. As I think about what I just wrote, I have answered another question, that being why are the U. S. and world economies floundering. Without a robust middle class in the U. S. we have reinvented our economy for the worse. The world economy depends on ours (at least for the time being) to flourish, so here's the bottom line. We have become a nation of rich and poor, with just a few hanging on to the title of middle class. I'm sure there is still a market for yachts and hamburger helper but the new Chevrolet is not going to find buyers pretty soon.

  • If you read on you will find that I worked at a television station.  The glory days of broadcasting are over, just as you might say about print media and radio.  Most of the young people I know get their entertainment from the internet, and the competition from the multitude of cable networks has led to an overall decrease in quality of programming.  The irony of this to me is the way the government demanded HDTV.  The stations had to pay for the upgrades like it or not, and do so with a dwindling income stream.  There is a movement afoot within the FCC to take away over the air television to make broadband internet more available in the countryside, with the idea that the internet could then be the medium to carry television.  I have found that most people have their HDTV's hooked up wrong and the standard definition picture is what they are watching and it looks worse than before the switch, usually stretched from side to side.  No wonder viewership is down.  The whole thing is too complicated for many people.  I've heard from many viewers who simply gave up trying to make digital TV work at their house.  Funny thing is, I don't remember the early days of TV being all that simple.  First you had to put an antenna on the roof, and when the set went south, it meant getting out the repair manual and taking a bag full of tubes to the drug shore to test.  Most problems with today's HDTVs can be corrected by reading the manual that came with the set. If you want a real sticker shock, try pricing an antenna installation with a conventional tower alongside your house.  A simple one will probably set you back about $2000.  I'd miss over the air TV.  I'd also miss real books, which as I suspect most of you know are being replaced with the electronic variety like the Kindle®.